IGCSE Curriculum

Year 10 to 11 (15 to 16 -years old)

Year 10 and 11 at FIS are spent studying for the International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE). Is compulsory for students to study English, Maths and at least one Science subject, however, students are able to the subjects most suited to them in finance, humanities and modern foreign languages.

Giving students the opportunity to make subject choices at this level gives them opportunities to demonstrate their learning capability and to begin focusing on their preferred areas of study. Assessment for the IGCSE course is in the form of written (summative) examinations which take place during May/June at the end of year 11.

FIS currently offers IGCSE courses in the following subjects as listed on the right pane.

Subjects

All candidates will study the following topics:

1. The fundamentals of accounting
2. Sources and recording of data
3. Verification of accounting records
4. Accounting procedures
5. Preparation of financial statements
6. Analysis and interpretation
7. Accounting principles and policies

All candidates will study the following topics:

1 Characteristic and classification of living organisms
2 Organisation of the organism
3 Movement in and out of cells
4 Biological molecules
5 Enzymes
6 Plant nutrition
7 Human nutrition
8 Transport in plants
9 Transport in animals
10 Diseases and immunity
11 Gas exchange in humans
12 Respiration
13 Excretion in humans
14 Coordination and response
15 Drugs
16 Reproduction
17 Inheritance
18 Variation and selection
19 Organisms and their environment
20 Biotechnology and genetic engineering
21 Human influences on ecosystems

All candidates will study the following topics:

1. Understanding business activity
2. People in business
3. Marketing
4. Operations management
5. Financial information and decisions
6 External influences on business activity

All candidates will study the following topics:

1 The particulate nature of matter
2 Experimental techniques
3 Atoms, elements and compounds
4 Stoichiometry
5 Electricity and chemistry
6 Chemical energetics
7 Chemical reactions
8 Acids, bases and salts
9 The Periodic Table
10 Metals
11 Air and water
12 Sulfur
13 Carbonates
14 Organic chemistry

All candidates will study the following topics:

Theory of computer science
1.1 Data representation
1.1.1 Binary systems
1.1.2 Hexadecimal
1.1.3 Data storage
1.2 Communication and Internet technologies
1.2.1 Data transmission
1.2.2 Security aspects
1.2.3 Internet principles of operation
1.3 Hardware and software
1.3.1 Logic gates
1.3.2 Computer architecture and the fetch-execute cycle
1.3.3 Input devices
1.3.4 Output devices
1.3.5 Memory, storage devices and media
1.3.6 Operating systems
1.3.7 High- and low-level languages and their translators
1.4 Security
1.5 Ethics

Practical problem-solving and programming
2.1 Algorithm design and problem-solving
2.1.1 Problem-solving and design
2.1.2 Pseudocode and flowcharts
2.2 Programming
2.2.1 Programming concepts
2.2.2 Data structures; arrays
2.3Databases

All candidates will study the following topics:

Reading
• Demonstrate understanding of written texts, and of the words and phrases within them
• Summarise and use material for a specific context
• Develop, analyse and evaluate facts, ideas and opinions
• Demonstrate understanding of how writers achieve their effects and influence readers
• Select appropriate information for specific purposes
• Recognise and respond to linguistic devices, figurative language and imagery.

Writing
• Express what is thought, felt and imagined
• Organise and convey facts, ideas and opinions effectively
• Demonstrate a varied vocabulary appropriate to the context
• Demonstrate effective use of sentence structures
• Demonstrate an understanding of audience, purpose and form
• Demonstrate accuracy in spelling, punctuation and grammar.

Speaking and listening
• Describe and reflect on experience, and express what is thought, felt and imagined
• Organise and convey facts, ideas and opinions effectively
• Understand and convey complex ideas
• Communicate with clarity, focus and purpose
• Communicate appropriately for the context
• Engage appropriately in conversation.

All candidates will study the following topics:

1 The basic economic problem
The first section of the syllabus introduces the fundamental ideas and concepts that underpin
the study of economics including the basic economic problem, factors of production,
opportunity cost and production possibility curves.
2 The allocation of resources
The fundamental principles of resource allocation are considered through the price mechanism
in a market economy. The market forces of demand and supply, market equilibrium and
disequilibrium, and elasticity form the core of this section.
3 Microeconomic decision makers
The micro economy is an important area of study, and the approach to learning taken here is
through the role of the major decision makers: banks, households, workers, trade unions and
firms.
4 Government and the macro economy
Governments have different macroeconomic aims, and conflicts often arise between the choice
of measures used to achieve them. Variables must be measured to consider the causes and
consequences of change, and appropriate policies applied
5 Economic development
As an economy develops there will be changes in population, living standards, poverty and
income redistribution. Therefore, the effects of changes in the size and structure of population
and of other influences on development in a variety of countries are explored.
6 International trade and globalization
The importance of trade between countries and the growth of globalization is explored.
Principles such as specialization, the role of free trade, the role of multinational companies,
foreign exchange rates and balance of payments stability are considered.

All candidates will study the following topics:

Listening
1. Understand short recordings dealing with everyday needs (e.g. simple transactions in
shops, simple directions or instructions).
2. Understand factual information and ideas from a range of sources (e.g. announcements,
phone messages, news items, interviews, dialogues) on familiar topics.
3. Understand descriptions of events, opinions, emotions, hopes and ambitions in simple
texts (e.g. in radio broadcasts, interviews, dialogues).
4. Identify main points, specific information and details on everyday topics (e.g. personal
and family information, shopping, local area, employment, school, leisure activities).
5. Identify main points, themes, opinions, ideas, emotions and attitudes in predictable
texts (e.g. news reports, conversations, interviews, simple monologues).
6. Deduce the meaning of occasional unknown words and expressions from the context.

Reading
1. Understand short, simple texts (e.g. signs and notices in public places, such as streets,
restaurants and bus/railway stations and airports).
2. Understand authentic texts on familiar topics and situations (e.g. newspaper/magazine
articles, email messages, blogs and letters).
3. Understand descriptions of events, opinions, emotions, hopes and ambitions in simple
texts (e.g. in articles, interviews or personal messages).
4. Identify main points, specific information and details in predictable texts (e.g.
advertisements, brochures, menus, timetables, instructions, messages).
5. Identify main points, themes, opinions, ideas, emotions and attitudes in predictable
texts (e.g. newspaper/magazine articles, simple plots of films or books).
6. Deduce the meaning of occasional unknown words and expressions from the context.
Speaking
1. Participate in short social exchanges (e.g. greet people, make and respond to invitations,
apologies) and communicate on familiar topics to meet simple needs (e.g. order food
and drink, simple transactions in shops, use public transport, ask and give directions,
request information).
2. Participate in unprepared conversations on familiar topics of personal interest or
relevant to everyday life (e.g. family, friends, home environment, hobbies and interests,
education, work, travel).
3. Describe past events and experiences, hopes and ambitions and give brief reasons for
opinions and plans.
4. Communicate with reasonable accuracy, using a range of structures, tenses and
vocabulary relevant to the given situation.
5. Use simple connectors (e.g. and, but, because, then) to link a series of shorter discrete
elements into a connected sequence of points.
6. Use appropriate strategies to maintain interaction.

7. Use features of pronunciation and intonation to convey meaning and attitude.

Writing
1. Fill in forms providing simple details.
2. Communicate simple factual information in writing using everyday vocabulary and
expressions.
3. Write a series of simple phrases and sentences linked with simple connectors, relating
to personal life, immediate environment and everyday topics (e.g. writing about a
holiday).
4. Write simple connected texts (e.g. email messages, articles) on familiar topics (e.g. plans
and arrangements, likes and dislikes, family, home environment, hobbies and interests,
education, work and travel).
5. Describe past events and experiences, opinions, hopes and ambitions and give brief
reasons for opinions and plans.
6. Communicate with reasonable accuracy, using a range of structures, tenses/time frames
and vocabulary relevant to the given situation.
7. Use simple connectors (e.g. and, but, because, then) to link a series of shorter discrete
elements into a connected sequence of points.

All candidates will study the following topics:

Population Dynamics
 Describe and give reasons for the rapid increase in the world’s population
 Show an understanding of over-population and under-population
 Understand the main causes of a change in population size
 Give reasons for contrasting rates of natural population change
 Describe and evaluate population policies
Migration
 Explain and give reasons for population migration
 Demonstrate an understanding of the impacts of Migration
Population Structure
 Identify and give reasons for and implications of different types of population structure
Population density and distribution
 Describe the factors influencing the density and distribution of the population
Settlements (rural and urban) and service provision
 Explain the patterns of settlement
 Describe and explain the factors which may influence the sites, growth and functions of
settlements
 Give reasons for the hierarchy of settlements and services
Urban settlements
 Describe and give reasons for the characteristics of, and changes in, land use in urban
areas
Urbanisation
 Identify and suggest reasons for rapid urban growth

All candidates study all the Core Content in either:

Option A

The nineteenth century: the development of modern nation states, 1848–1914
The content focuses on the following Key Questions:
• Were the Revolutions of 1848 important?
• How was Italy unified?
• How was Germany unified?
• Why was there a civil war in the United States and what were its results?
• Why, and with what effects, did Europeans expand their overseas empires in the nineteenth
century?
• What caused the First World War

OR

Option B
The twentieth century: international relations since 1919
The content focuses on the following Key Questions:
• Were the peace treaties of 1919–23 fair?
• To what extent was the League of Nations a success?
• Why had international peace collapsed by 1939?
• Who was to blame for the Cold War?
• How effectively did the United States contain the spread of Communism?
• How secure was the USSR’s control over Eastern Europe, 1948–c.1989?
• Why did events in the Gulf matter, c.1970–2000?

In addition, all candidates must also study at least one of the following Depth Studies:
• The First World War, 1914–18
• Germany, 1918–45
• Russia, 1905–41
• The United States, 1919–41
• China, c.1930–c.1990
• South Africa, c.1940–c.1994
• Israelis and Palestinians since 1945

All candidates will study the following topics:

1. Number
 Number
2. Algebra
 Algebra and graphs
 Coordinate geometry
3. Shape and space
 Geometry
 Mensuration
 Trigonometry
 Vectors and transformations
4. Probability and statistics
 Probability
 Statistics

All candidates will study the following topics:

1 . General physics
2. Thermal physics
3. Properties of waves, including light and sound
4. Electricity and magnetism
5. Atomic physics

All candidates will study the following topics:

Unit 1: Theory and methods
 How do different sociologists interpret society?
 How do sociologists study society?
 What types of information and data do sociologists use?
Unit 2: Culture, identity and socialisation
 What is the relationship between the individual and society?
 How do we learn to be human?
Unit 3: Social inequality
 What is social stratification?
 What are the main features of social inequality and how are these created

All candidates will study the following topics:

1 Reading

• understand public notices and signs (including timetables and advertisements)
• identify and select correct details from simple texts
• select and organise relevant information from a range of texts that are likely to be
within the experience of young people and reflecting the interests of people from varied
cultural backgrounds, such as blogs, brochures, emails, forms, imaginative writing,
letters, magazines, newspapers and webpages
• identify some ideas, opinions and attitudes in a range of texts
 understand what is implied but not directly stated within a text, such as gist, opinion,
writer’s purpose and intention
• identify the important points or themes within an extended piece of writing
• draw conclusions from an extended text and recognise connections between related
ideas within a text
2 Writing
• communicate factual information, ideas and arguments in short and extended writing
tasks in appropriate and accurate Swahili
• respond to a written stimulus and use appropriate register and style/format for the
given purpose and audience, such as a summary, an informal letter/email, an article, a
blog, a report or review
• use a range of grammatical structures, punctuation and vocabulary
• express opinions and use appropriate register/style
• select and organize information and ideas into coherent paragraphs and use a range of
linking devices
3 Listening
• understand factual information and ideas from a range of sources, such as a recorded
phone message, news or weather report, travel broadcast, interview, dialogue, memoir
or telephone conversation
• identify relevant information and select correct details from a range of sources
• identify ideas, opinions and attitudes from a range of sources and understand the
connections between them
• show some awareness of what is implied but not directly stated, such as gist, purpose
and intention
4 Speaking (optional)
• communicate factual information, ideas and arguments
• use a range of appropriate vocabulary and grammatical structures using suitable
pronunciation and intonation
• organize and link ideas with a range of appropriate linking devices
• give a short, clear presentation without a script on a topic of their choice
• demonstrate competence in a range of speech activities, such as respond to questions
on topics within a defined range (for example, past and present schooling, future plans
and current affairs)

• take part in a conversation and demonstrate flexibility in dealing with new ideas and
other speakers’ responses
• show a sense of audience

IGCSE Subject Selection

The curriculum for Year 10 and Year 11 is set up with a compulsory core of two subjects and six optional subjects chosen by the individual student. The core subjects are:
• Global Perspectives
• Mathematics

Students should select one subject from each option block below:

Option Subjects
A English First Language /English Second Language
B Biology / Economics
C Chemistry / History / Business Studies
D Geography / Computer Science
E Accounting / Physics / Sociology
F French / Swahili / Turkish / Native Language(self-study)

Non-examinable subjects:
• Physical Education
• Physical Social Health and Economic Education (PSHE)

Notes:

  • Minimum class size is 7 students – below this number the subject will not be offered.
  • Students will not be permitted to change their course selection after 30th September.
  • The School Administration reserves the right to change or adapt this selection policy at any time.
  • The number of students in either core or optional classes will not exceed 24.
  • Admittance for optional subjects will be based on evidence of prior performance

If you need advice or guidance on which subjects to choose, please  contact our Admissions department via admissions@fezaint.com